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March 23, - Published on Amazon. Verified Purchase. First, an admission: I'm not coming at this book from the point of view of a complete stranger. Mr Dail is an occasional visitor to and commenter on my blog, and over the months we've struck up something of an online friendship. That said, I've tried as always not to let this stand in the way of an honest appraisal of the book.

This small caveat aside, here's my review of 'The Imaginings'. When David Blithe finds this cryptic message scrawled on a piece of paper in his brother Peter's apartment shortly after his apparent suicide, he doubts Peter's sanity.

Paul Adams - Imaginings

In fact, as shortly becomes clear, Peter was the helpless victim of a very dark force indeed - and the unfortunate David will be next. Interestingly, the theme of imprisonment, of one sort or another, runs through the novel: one character lives in an orphanage, and is locked in after dark; another works in a vast underground labyrinth, in which a series of locked doors lead into a succession of increasingly sinister and claustrophobic rooms.

This is a novel about demonic possession - not generally one of my favourite horror themes, but executed so well here that I was quickly drawn into the action, and kept there. Unlike other tales of possession, the demon does not restrict itself to one particular host, but can take possession of different bodies at will. This adds an additional layer of fear; how can you trust anyone, or ever feel safe, when anyone could at any moment become the conduit for a malign force?

It also poses some interesting questions: is morality determined by our deeds, or by our souls? Is it possible for a soul to remain pure when the flesh becomes the instrument of evil? This is a well-written, tightly plotted story: Dail's prose is economical yet evocative. The characters are drawn vividly and well, with a satisfying depth and complexity, and we are made to care about them; I was genuinely upset when a genial priest fell foul of the demon.

Reading other reviews of the novel, I noticed that several readers have made a slight criticism, namely that a critical scene at the climax of the novel is repeated from the points of view of two different characters. It's hard to say much about this without giving away certain elements of the plot, but it was felt that this slowed down the action. This is no doubt a matter of personal preference, but I didn't find that this troubled me at all; in fact, I actually found that it rounded the action out in quite a satisfying way.

Whatever your own preferences, though, this is a minor point, and shouldn't distract anyone from Dail's achievement in taking a plot that could easily have become immensely convoluted and bringing it tightly, carefully, cleverly to its conclusion. The steady build-up of tension keeps you hooked, and while it's not a particularly short novel I got through it in a couple of sittings.

Indeed, I almost arrived late for work one morning, when I made the mistake of reading it over breakfast. That's the mark of a good page-turner! Jill-Elizabeth Jill Franclemont. January 13, - Published on Amazon. So here we are, holiday week, Christmas is coming to my household, and what am I bringing you for Book Review Tuesday fare? Why, creepy, scary, horror of course! And what better time to escape than the holiday season? I don't know about you, but I'm beat - decorating, shopping, cards, gifts, parties are all great things, but the sheer volume sometimes overwhelms me.

Especially since this year I'm doing it all while we are in the process of settling into New House hooray for New House! Dail revisits this theme in many guises.

See a Problem?

One character is kept in something of a modern day orphanage, locked in after dark. Other characters work underground in a series of tunnels closed off by more than one door. With a hat tip to Poe, Dail even literally walls one character into a confined space. Through Mashart, we visit Hell. There the damned- and, it seems, some innocents unjustly stolen by Mashart - are tortured for what "…amounted to at least a century before …[they] dissolve into the frozen flesh of the Dark Lord for eternity.

Dail combines psychological anxiety and good, old-fashioned scary. There are plenty of dark, creepy moments. Even better, there is the chance that no one is who they seem to be because Dail has redefined the way demonic possession 'works'. Mashart doesn't settle into just one character Exorcist-style; no, he flows from character to character. Mashart has compelling reasons to return to David, but the demon isn't picky: he'll hop a ride in a handy real estate agent if it serves his purposes.

haunting the imaginings of all Christendom

Like all good horror, The Imaginings lends itself to serious discussion about human nature. For example, the battle between David and Mashart for control of David's ravaged body is a chilling reminder that our flesh can host evil. In Rosemary's Baby, evil gestates, but in The Imaginings, evil is fully formed. Mashart is out 'there' but it can also be in 'here', within you, noticeable only when it wants you to know it is there. Mashart uses David's body as an implement of torture and death, allowing Dail to imply some pretty weighty questions: Is morality tied to the flesh, or to the soul? Can our bodies do evil, and our souls remain innocent?

Are good and evil quantifiable and, if so, can the balance between the two be upset? Slight spoiler in this paragraph!


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My primary gripe is with the ending. The description of Mashart leaving David's body is exceptionally well-executed, and the spiritual climax is both surprising and fitting. However, the satisfying sense of completion it should have effected is diluted by sheer excess. A pivotal scene is repeated from different perspectives, and the repetition slowed the action. Dail can count himself in good company, though; I have the same gripe about Dostoyevsky's epilog to Crime and Punishment.

Spiritualists, horror aficionados, and inquirers into human nature will all find something in Dail's book to delight - and ignite - their imaginings! Mar 04, Mari Biella rated it really liked it Shelves: horror , indie. First, an admission: I'm not coming at this book from the point of view of a complete stranger. Mr Dail is an occasional visitor to and commenter on my blog, and over the months we've struck up something of an online friendship.

That said, I've tried as always not to let this stand in the way of an honest appraisal of the book. This small caveat aside, here's my review of The Imaginings. When David Blithe First, an admission: I'm not coming at this book from the point of view of a complete stranger.

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When David Blithe finds this cryptic message scrawled on a piece of paper in his brother Peter's apartment shortly after his apparent suicide, he doubts Peter's sanity. In fact, as shortly becomes clear, Peter was the helpless victim of a very dark force indeed - and the unfortunate David will be next. Interestingly, the theme of imprisonment, of one sort or another, runs through the novel: one character lives in an orphanage, and is locked in after dark; another works in a vast underground labyrinth, in which a series of locked doors lead into a succession of increasingly sinister and claustrophobic rooms.

This is a novel about demonic possession - not generally one of my favourite horror themes, but executed so well here that I was quickly drawn into the action, and kept there. Unlike other tales of possession, the demon does not restrict itself to one particular host, but can take possession of different bodies at will. This adds an additional layer of fear; how can you trust anyone, or ever feel safe, when anyone could at any moment become the conduit for a malign force? It also poses some interesting questions: is morality determined by our deeds, or by our souls?

Is it possible for a soul to remain pure when the flesh becomes the instrument of evil? This is a well-written, tightly plotted story: Dail's prose is economical yet evocative. The characters are drawn vividly and well, with a satisfying depth and complexity, and we are made to care about them; I was genuinely upset when a genial priest fell foul of the demon. Reading other reviews of the novel, I noticed that several readers have made a slight criticism, namely that a critical scene at the climax of the novel is repeated from the points of view of two different characters.

It's hard to say much about this without giving away certain elements of the plot, but it was felt that this slowed down the action. This is no doubt a matter of personal preference, but I didn't find that this troubled me at all; in fact, I actually found that it rounded the action out in quite a satisfying way. Whatever your own preferences, though, this is a minor point, and shouldn't distract anyone from Dail's achievement in taking a plot that could easily have become immensely convoluted and bringing it tightly, carefully, cleverly to its conclusion.

The steady build-up of tension keeps you hooked, and while it's not a particularly short novel I got through it in a couple of sittings. Indeed, I almost arrived late for work one morning, when I made the mistake of reading it over breakfast. That's the mark of a good page-turner! Oct 31, Jill Elizabeth rated it really liked it. So here we are, holiday week, Christmas is coming to my household, and what am I bringing you for Book Review Tuesday fare? Why, creepy, scary, horror of course!

And what better time to escape than the holiday season? The Imaginings is a great example of the traditional horror story. The story starts out with a suicide and things only get messier from there.

http://cloud1.easyhost.pk/xag-hydroxychloroquine-et-diphosphate.php In the wake of said suicide his brother , David Blithe is trying to understand exactly what happened and what the rather cryptic last words about not disregarding your imaginings might mean.